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Stock 18” on 35s

They aren't BAD in snow. Just not as good as the Duratracs. Thing is, there aren't many tires that are as good in the snow/rain as Duratracs. That's why so many use them despite the noise and ride quality issues.

If you are looking for a Duratrac alternative, check out the new Territory MT. I'm running them now and so far very happy with my purchase. They seem to have the Duratrac's bad weather ability but with less noise and weight.
I have the stock Duratracs and they absolutely suck in the rain. I'll feather the throttle from a dead stop and still be spinning out. I'll even fish tail at times if I'm making a turn while lightly hitting the gas.
 
I have the stock Duratracs and they absolutely suck in the rain. I'll feather the throttle from a dead stop and still be spinning out. I'll even fish tail at times if I'm making a turn while lightly hitting the gas.

Maybe you have different rain where you drive? I have extensive experience with Duratracs and they are the best aggressive AT (or "off-road AT") in the rain/snow that i've found.

To an extent, you are always going to have rear traction issues in the wet with a pickup. There's not enough weight back there...but even knowing that, Duratracs handle it better than any tire in their class that I know of.
 
The OEM equipped Duratracs aren’t as good as aftermarket Duratracs that have the 3-peak mountain snowflake rating.

That's possible...but I have driven on both and didn't notice a significant difference. Regardless of subjective reviews, they definitely don't "suck" in the rain. The crappiest Duratracs are going to be better than a lot of brand new alternatives.
 
I upgraded my stock size to Duratracs in 285/75r18 and still have the OE wheels. That's more of a 11.25" width tire and not a 12.5". Mathematically that size tire gives out to 34.8", but Goodyear says it's actually a 35.1" tire. I get a little rub on lock, but I haven't installed spacers yet nor a leveling kit. I actually have both in the garage, but been busy. I did initially rub on the mud flaps, so I replaced those with the mud flap delete kit from McGaughy's. That's about $125. I've been told Rough Country makes a mud flap delete kit for about $65.

The advice about leveling kits and recommendations to buy use 4Auto. That's coming from every leveling kit manufacturer. I spoke to ReadyLift and they told me there's a noise with 4Auto. They haven't looked into what the noise is, and won't. They're just covering their butts. Not every truck makes the noise, and some people have said they don't hear the noise. 4 Hi and 4 Lo are not affected.

Pulsar LT is around $600, iirc. If you're only interested in calibrating your speedo, Rough Country to the rescue again, and for several hundred dollars cheaper. I had no desire to do any of the other stuff the Pulsar LT does, so it was one of those rare situations where Rough Country won out. There gave also been issues with the Pulsar when it came to getting the truck serviced. Lonestar Hawaiian did a video on that, too.

As for the noise from the Duratracs, it actually goes away over time. I wrote my original one to 50,000 miles. They weren't bald, but were low on tread life. At that point they were silent.

Biggest reason I got Duratracs and not another tire was weight. The 35s I got are only 10 lbs heavier than the OE Duratrac size, and the 35s are E-rated. Many other tires are a bit heavier. Rotational mass and unsprung weight can add up to issues. Speaking of E-rated tires, these Duratracs corner better because of the stiffer sidewall. However, they ride a little bit more rough, too.

I'm no expert, but I'm willing to share what little knowledge I have. Just ask if you have any questions.
I have 49K miles on my stock duratracs and they are still loud and annoying as hell at certain speeds; I can’t see them eventually getting quieter for they have only gotten worse even with rotations, but we’ll see. How are your larger duratracs faring with the noise? I think the noise levels on the stocks would prevent me from ever buying another, same or different size.

As far as leveling the truck, yes I’m aware the manufacturers warn against using 4auto. I’ve done research myself on this, and like you said, there seems to not be a totally concrete answer as to reasons against using it, but I have read that the constant engaging and disengaging of the 4wd, especially at highway speeds, could be a detriment.


Regarding tire weights, yes I have indeed read about rotational mass and problems with heavier tires; that’s why I am researching and trying to gather all the info I can before I do make a final purchase. Lots of great info on here to help.
 
Tire weight is HUUUGE. Stay away from E-Rated tires...those are designed for the HDs that are towing and hauling daily. Back before I knew anything about tire load rating I put 33" E-range Duratracs on my Tahoe. The ride quality instantly became crap and I lost 2.5mpg. A few years later when Goodyear released D-range Duratracs in that size I switched immediately and got stock ride quality back and gained 1.5mpg back.

The stock 32" Duratrac on the TB weighs 41lbs which is INCREDIBLY light for that size and type of tire. That makes it really difficult to go larger and not add a bunch of weight. Sticking to C-rated tires is imperative unless you want to really ruin the experience. Our trucks do a pretty great job on efficiency given their size...I'm still seeing 16-17mpg city despite 35's and a high-clearance steel front bumper...but I was really careful to keep rotational weight down as much as I could.
What tire brand is your 35s if you don’t mind me asking? Do you have it leveled? Spacers? Is it safe to assume you would need both to fit them? Appreciate the in depth info on weight..I’ll keep that in mind👍🏼
 
What tire brand is your 35s if you don’t mind me asking? Do you have it leveled? Spacers? Is it safe to assume you would need both to fit them? Appreciate the in depth info on weight..I’ll keep that in mind👍🏼

Goodyear Territory MT (tread pattern A). I have the Readylift 1.75" level without the bottom spacer, so really it's a 1" level. I have aftermarket wheels with 0 offset so that's roughly equivalent to stock wheels with a 1" spacer. I still had to remove the mudflap bracket but then I just re-mounted the mudflap without the bracket and I have at least 3/4" clearance at the worst angle.
 
So in northern WI we get enough rain and snow. I have stated that I liked the Duratrac's for what I put my truck through. I never cared about the noise. I had 285/75R18. I liked that they were 35.1" tall on my six inch lift. They made it look right. If some tire maker made a decent 36" tire I'd prefer that. Decided to have the 285/75R18 Nitto Ridge Grapplers put on last Friday. They are also 35.1" tall. I like the aggressive look of them but not Impressed at all with them in the snow. I took the advice that they were just as good as the Duratrac's. So I guess I will end up buying another set of Fuel rims and Duratrac's for the winter. Bottom line, if you live in snow, you will never beat the Duratrac's!
 
So in northern WI we get enough rain and snow. I have stated that I liked the Duratrac's for what I put my truck through. I never cared about the noise. I had 285/75R18. I liked that they were 35.1" tall on my six inch lift. They made it look right. If some tire maker made a decent 36" tire I'd prefer that. Decided to have the 285/75R18 Nitto Ridge Grapplers put on last Friday. They are also 35.1" tall. I like the aggressive look of them but not Impressed at all with them in the snow. I took the advice that they were just as good as the Duratrac's. So I guess I will end up buying another set of Fuel rims and Duratrac's for the winter. Bottom line, if you live in snow, you will never beat the Duratrac's!
The Nitto Ridge Grapplers aren't particularly great in the snow, and can be scary in the rain. They tend to do better on heavier 3/4 ton trucks, probably because of the weight, but not very good on the 1500's. I hope your experience is different, good luck!

My Duratrac's were awesome in snow, ice, sand, and mud. They howled like a chorus of banshees on the highway, but I never lacked for traction. The Bridgestone Dueler RSW's have been good as well, but definitely not as off road oriented as the Duratracs.
 
I have 49K miles on my stock duratracs and they are still loud and annoying as hell at certain speeds; I can’t see them eventually getting quieter for they have only gotten worse even with rotations, but we’ll see. How are your larger duratracs faring with the noise? I think the noise levels on the stocks would prevent me from ever buying another, same or different size.

As far as leveling the truck, yes I’m aware the manufacturers warn against using 4auto. I’ve done research myself on this, and like you said, there seems to not be a totally concrete answer as to reasons against using it, but I have read that the constant engaging and disengaging of the 4wd, especially at highway speeds, could be a detriment.


Regarding tire weights, yes I have indeed read about rotational mass and problems with heavier tires; that’s why I am researching and trying to gather all the info I can before I do make a final purchase. Lots of great info on here to help.
My larger Duratracs have less than 5k miles on them, so they haven't had a chance to wear down enough to howl. I'm also running a 5 tire rotation since I upgraded the spare to match. So it may take a little longer to know. That also means if they howl I'll have to put up with it longer too.

Regarding the 4 auto issue, I reached out to ReadyLift directly and asked them. They said there's a noise coming from the transfer case, but they never bothered to look into it. I suspect it's a front axle shaft length issue, but don't have the means to find out. If/when a CV fails I think I'll look more closely into the CV axles NAPA has for lifted trucks. They're suppose to extend in the middle shaft to allow for the extra length needed. Iirc, the added length is about 1 inch, so it's not much. I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 
Maybe you have different rain where you drive? I have extensive experience with Duratracs and they are the best aggressive AT (or "off-road AT") in the rain/snow that i've found.

To an extent, you are always going to have rear traction issues in the wet with a pickup. There's not enough weight back there...but even knowing that, Duratracs handle it better than any tire in their class that I know of.
It may not be the rain that's the problem, but the element that shows a problem with the road. Southern California doesn't get much rain, but there's probably a bunch of oil sitting in the grooves of the road that comes to the surface when it rains. I grew up and learned his to drive in Northern Utah. I've lived an Northern Illinois and driven in Southern Wisconsin, Philadelphia, southeastern Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina. I'm now in the Florida panhandle. Everywhere is a bit different. In Southern California feathering the throttle at very low speed resulted in tire spin and the elocker engaging. Very frustrating when tire only in the parking lot of your kids elementary school and just trying to pick them up in the afternoon.
 
Maybe you have different rain where you drive? I have extensive experience with Duratracs and they are the best aggressive AT (or "off-road AT") in the rain/snow that i've found.

To an extent, you are always going to have rear traction issues in the wet with a pickup. There's not enough weight back there...but even knowing that, Duratracs handle it better than any tire in their class that I know of.
It may not be the rain that's the problem, but the element that shows a problem with the road. Southern California doesn't get much rain, but there's probably a bunch of oil sitting in the grooves of the road that comes to the surface when it rains. I grew up and learned his to drive in Northern Utah. I've lived an Northern Illinois and driven in Southern Wisconsin, Philadelphia, southeastern Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina. I'm now in the Florida panhandle. Everywhere is a bit different. In Southern California feathering the throttle at very low speed resulted in tire spin and the elocker engaging. Very frustrating when you're only in the parking lot of your kids elementary school and just trying to pick them up during an afternoon rainstorm.
 
I have it done and you do rub. You’re gonna have to go readylift kit 2” and spacers 1.5”. I ran 35x12.5x18 ridge grapplers.
Are TB's not level out the factory then? It's frustrating because sometimes mine looks perfectly level, other times it doesn't!
 
Are TB's not level out the factory then? It's frustrating because sometimes mine looks perfectly level, other times it doesn't!
They are leveled from factory but it’s not a true level with the truck bed. Lifting it 2” inches will put you at fender height of 41.5” front and back for a true level without lifting the rear just the front. My truck is a street cowboy the only thing I pull is a 30 foot boat on the weekends.
 
In Southern California feathering the throttle at very low speed resulted in tire spin...

This is a problem I never had with the Duratracs until after the 30k mile plus mark...and at that point you won't find a tire that WON'T do that. The KO2 and Ridge Grappler start doing this at about the 10k mark.

I know it was mentioned that the OEM Duratracs are not the same as the aftermarket ones, and that could be a factor I suppose, since all the Duratracs i've owned deep into the 20k mile and 30k mile territory were aftermarket. I switched the stockers on my TB at 18k cause I went to 35's. At that point, they were still good as new in the traction department.
 

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