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Welcome to the new Trail Boss Camping Forum!

I have a 30 foot travel trailer the TB tows very well. Me and my wife have had it all over the western states. The last two years has been with the Trail Boss. But at least once a year I get together with an old friend and do a true overland trip. That means the RV stays home and me and him go wheeling for about 10 days. . We do it the way I grew up, pitch a tent or even better yet just throw a sleeping bag on the ground.

Bride Canyon, Moab, Utah
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Bride Canyon

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Campsite Potato Bottom B, White Rim Trail, Canyonlands National Park UT.

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Near Lake City, CO on the Alpine Loop.

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Sometimes its fancy sometimes its quick and easy. Hot dogs taste way better at 9000 ft, with a cocktail.

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The "high point" of this trip.

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This is outside Moab, UT. One of my favorite sunrises ever. We pulled into this dispersed campsite after dark. We threw our sleeping bags on the ground and when I woke up it seemed like we were on a differnt planet. It was incredible. Tailgate breakfast and we were on the trail.

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I'm loving everything this truck can do.

Steve
 

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Moab is Beautiful! One of my favorite places to travel.

Did you have any issues with a full size truck on Engineer's Pass?

This was at Lake Conroe in Texas
 

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The Alpine Loop area of CO is one of my favorite places on earth. I have done most of it. Ouray, Silverton, Lake City and Telluride. It is perfect for a Trail Boss as long as you know where NOT to go. I would never consider Black Bear Pass and I stay away from Poughkeepsie Gulch. The vast majority of the trails are graded road through the most beautiful mountains in the world. Any stock TB can do most of it. In the Animas Forks area you even see people beating on their Subarues and making it if they come in from Silverton.

Engineer Pass is easy with one big caviot, the 7 miles of Mineral Creek outside Ouray. I am a big fan of the FunTrecks guidebooks by Charles Wells. He correctly lists Mineral Creek as its own separate trail and rates it as difficult, it is. Many other guides lump it in as part of the Engineer Pass trail. You dont have to run it to get to Engineer Pass. On a recent trip we ran it from Lake City over Engineer Pass to Ouray via Mineral Creek even though I had a pretty good idea of what we were getting into. My truck has rock sliders and a custom differential skid plate as well as a front end level. Without those I would have done damage with all of the rock crawling. The Razor guys we came across were advising us to turn around but we made it. It was a great ride. I can't recommend it if your truck is bone stock. Other than that most of the Alpine Loop is perfect for a stock TB.

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I see a lot of guys on this forum in CO. I wish I had this in my backyard. I drive up from Phoenix to enoy it.

Steve
 
I would love to get a chance to do the Alpine Loop, your pictures alone show why. Being in Houston, Texas, I'm 2 days of driving away from Utah, Colorado, Arizona, so any significant elevation change is a mind boggling geographical wonder to me, lol. Super Jealous!
 
I'm a bit of a poser as it was more rustic cabin than campsite, but what the heck.
2.5 Hrs Northeast of Toronto Canada. Totally black bear country (in the summer), and well into Moose country. Our visit was well timed with a December snowstorm that dumped close to a foot on us overnight.
Not to be Beaten by the weather, the Trail Boss went into 4wd and we made the 10 mile trek into the neighboring town to eat at the local inn. I guess nobody else had a Trail Boss as we were the only patrons in the restaurant during the dinner rush. Either that, or the only citiots (city + idiots) dumb enough to risk the storm for a pork schnitzel dinner. Totally roughing it. 😁
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I'm a bit of a poser as it was more rustic cabin than campsite, but what the heck.
2.5 Hrs Northeast of Toronto Canada. Totally black bear country (in the summer), and well into Moose country. Our visit was well timed with a December snowstorm that dumped close to a foot on us overnight.
Not to be Beaten by the weather, the Trail Boss went into 4wd and we made the 10 mile trek into the neighboring town to eat at the local inn. I guess nobody else had a Trail Boss as we were the only patrons in the restaurant during the dinner rush. Either that, or the only citiots (city + idiots) dumb enough to risk the storm for a pork schnitzel dinner. Totally roughing it. 😁 View attachment 5116
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I love this post! Life is an adventure! A Ford might not have made it to the pork schnitzel dinner!
 
Ive been looking at the Tents for the bed? How do ya like it? Any paticular brand over another?
I liked it. However, It wasn't an exact fit. I had some difficulty making it work. Also, I wouldn't recommend it for someone with bad knees. It was rough for me getting in and out. For a younger person, I would say it's great. I had a large mattress inside. You're off the ground, high above any bugs or small animals. You can't use your vehicle while it's on. I think it's from Rightline. I got it off of Amazon. Hope this helps.
 
I liked it. However, It wasn't an exact fit. I had some difficulty making it work. Also, I wouldn't recommend it for someone with bad knees. It was rough for me getting in and out. For a younger person, I would say it's great. I had a large mattress inside. You're off the ground, high above any bugs or small animals. You can't use your vehicle while it's on. I think it's from Rightline. I got it off of Amazon. Hope this helps.
hello

cant wait to get back out camping again already to go May 12/23 .... heading to a provincial park in ontraio ..... happy camping cheers

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Each summer I do a multi day overland trip with a friend of mine. First year it was 7 days on Moab trails. Last year it was 10 days. Moab, including running the White Rim trail inside Canyonlands National Park and several days on the Alpine Loop in CO.

This year we have decided to go big time remote. We are headed to The Maze District of Canyonlands NP in August. We will also do trails exploring Lake Powell for a few days on our way North.

The advance planning for these trips is a lot of fun. I have all kinds of technology. I subscribe to Gaiagps.com and trailsoffroad.com. Both are well worth the small annual fee. I scrub the internet for all the specific trail information I can find. I waste time on YouTube trying to get a look at terrain, most people don't put much useful info in their videos.

But really, even with all of the tech it starts with good old fashioned paper. I love my full size maps and guide books. My favorite trail maps are the National Geographic trail series. My guide books are published by FunTreks and authored by Charles Wells.

It's a blast on the trail with a tailgate lunch and a big map spread out. I would never rely on technology alone in the backcountry.

Steve

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Each summer I do a multi day overland trip with a friend of mine. First year it was 7 days on Moab trails. Last year it was 10 days. Moab, including running the White Rim trail inside Canyonlands National Park and several days on the Alpine Loop in CO.

This year we have decided to go big time remote. We are headed to The Maze District of Canyonlands NP in August. We will also do trails exploring Lake Powell for a few days on our way North.

The advance planning for these trips is a lot of fun. I have all kinds of technology. I subscribe to Gaiagps.com and trailsoffroad.com. Both are well worth the small annual fee. I scrub the internet for all the specific trail information I can find. I waste time on YouTube trying to get a look at terrain, most people don't put much useful info in their videos.

But really, even with all of the tech it starts with good old fashioned paper. I love my full size maps and guide books. My favorite trail maps are the National Geographic trail series. My guide books are published by FunTreks and authored by Charles Wells.

It's a blast on the trail with a tailgate lunch and a big map spread out. I would never rely on technology alone in the backcountry.

Steve

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PB&J, beef jerky, and whiskey. Only the staples. I like it.
 

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